Flourishing scale
8 questions

The Flourishing scale (FS) measures people’s success (self rated) in key areas of one’s life, such as relationships and having a sense of purpose.

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Penn State Worry Questionnaire
16 questions

Everyone worries from time to time, and many people consider themselves worriers. Worries are usually a “what if'' question about something terrible happening in the immediate or distant future. Examples could be: “What if we get caught in traffic tomorrow and I’m late for the game? The coach will be so angry at me and kick me off the team.” “What if I choose the wrong topic for my essay and then change my mind halfway through, and then it’s too late, and I do a really crappy job?” The PSWQ is a self-report scale designed to measure worry in adults.

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Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale
27 questions

Dealing with uncertainty is an unavoidable part of daily life. Because we can’t see the future, we can never be certain about what exactly is going to happen day to day. Research has found that people vary in their ability to tolerate uncertainty. That is, some people are fine with having a lot of uncertainty in their lives, and other people cannot stand even a small amount of uncertainty. When people who are intolerant of uncertainty are exposed to a little bit of uncertainty, they also have a strong reaction: they worry, and do everything they can think of to get away from, avoid or eliminate the uncertainty. But being very intolerant of uncertainty can cause problems, since it leads to a lot of time-consuming and tiring behaviors, causes stress and anxiety, and is the major fuel for worry.

Learn more
Attitudes Towards Self
10 questions

The ATS scale measures the tendency to be self-critical at any failure to perform well, holdings of overly high standards, and finally, the tendency to generalize from a single failure to the broader sense of self-worth.

Learn more
General Self Efficacy scale
10 questions

Self-efficacy is the belief that you can effectively reach the goals you have, whether that is solving a puzzle, successfully preparing and succeeding in your exam, or dealing with hardships. Self-efficacy is often considered in respect to specific goals or challenges. The generalized self-efficacy scale is about the general belief in oneself to solve problems and reach goals. The GSE is one of the best-known scales.

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Patient Health Questionnaire
9 questions

Depression isn’t just a case of the blues where you feel down for a while. Most people go through periods of feeling down, but when you’re depressed you feel persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days. Depression affects people in different ways and can cause a wide range of symptoms from lasting feelings of unhappiness and hopelessness, to losing interest in the things you used to enjoy. Symptoms of depression can occur along a spectrum both in duration and severity. This test is often used in a primary care setting to assess the likelihood of depression and how severe it might be. The screening has nine questions, and those questions ask how often you have been bothered by a series of nine problems during the last two weeks. The questions address sleep, energy, appetite, and other symptoms of depression, as well as the frequency of these symptoms.

Learn more
Personality test
44 questions

This test measures five personality traits: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism. Openness measures your level of creativity and desire for knowledge and new experiences; Conscientiousness measures your levels of thoughtfulness, impulse control, and goal-directed behaviors; Extraversion measures excitability, sociability, talkativeness, assertiveness, and emotional expressiveness; Agreeableness measures trust, altruism, kindness, affection, and other prosocial behaviour; and Neuroticism measures emotional instability or tendency to experience negative emotions, such as anger, anxiety, or depression.

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Self-control
36 questions

Self-control is the ability to regulate one’s emotions, thoughts, and behavior in the face of temptations and impulses. Common goals such as exercising regularly, eating a balanced diet, being more productive, giving up bad habits, and saving money are just a few worthwhile ambitions that usually require self-control to achieve. Self-control is important for maintaining healthy behaviors. The Self-Control Scale measures an individual's ability to control their impulses, alter their thoughts and emotions and prevent undesired behavioural tendencies to prevent acting upon them.

Learn more
Executive skills
36 questions

Executive function skills are the mental processes that enable us to plan, focus attention, remember instructions, juggle multiple tasks successfully, and self-regulate. Executive skills are highly correlated with success in life. Knowing our skills, identifying our challenges, and finding coping strategies are key. The ESQ was developed to help you understand your executive skills, and identify or verify potential problem areas, rather than as an objective measure of problem areas. The most important thing the ESQ attempts to clarify is whether your pattern of strengths and weaknesses enable you to be (reasonably) successful in managing your responsibilities and challenges.

Learn more
Attachement Style
40 questions

Attachment styles describe the different ways people interact and behave in relationships. Research has shown that our attachment style is set in early childhood and persists throughout our lifetime. The styles are either secure or insecure. If a child grows up with consistency, reliability, and safety, they will likely have a secure style of attachment. As adults, the individuals who are securely attached tend to have trusting, lasting relationships, good self-esteem, the ability to share feelings with partners and friends, and seek out social support. Individuals who develop insecure attachment did not grow up in a consistent, supportive, validating environment. As adults, they generally have trouble making emotional connections with others; they can be aggressive or unpredictable toward their loved ones. Signs of insecure attachment style often include depression and anxiety, frequent outbursts and erratic behaviors, poor self-image and self-hatred, and the perpetuation of trauma in relationships.

Learn more
Emotional Intelligence
50 questions

Emotional intelligence is the ability to understand, interpret, and manage your emotions and those of other people. If you have high EQ, you can communicate with others, show empathy when needed, and overcome emotionally-charged situations. This self-assessment questionnaire is designed to get you thinking about the various competencies of emotional intelligence as they apply to you. The competencies include self-awareness (i.e. the ability to recognize what you are feeling, to understand your habitual emotional responses to events, and to recognize how your emotions affect your behaviour and performance), managing emotions (i.e. the ability to stay focused and think clearly even when experiencing powerful emotions.), motivating oneself (i.e. the ability to use your deepest emotions to move and guide you towards your goals), empathy (i.e. the ability to sense, understand and respond to what other people are feeling), and social skill (i.e. the ability to manage, influence and inspire emotions in others).

Learn more
Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale
24 questions

It’s normal to feel nervous in some social situations. For example, going on a date or giving a presentation may cause that feeling of butterflies in your stomach. Feelings of shyness or discomfort in certain situations aren’t necessarily signs of social anxiety disorder. Comfort levels in social situations vary, depending on personality traits and life experiences. Some people are naturally reserved and others are more outgoing. Contrary to everyday nervousness, social anxiety disorder induces fear, anxiety and avoidance that interfere with relationships, daily routines, work, school or other activities. Liebowitz Social Anxiety test assesses the way that social anxiety plays a role in your life across a variety of situations.

Learn more
Novaco Anger Scale
25 questions

We all feel angry at times – it’s part of being human. Anger is a normal, healthy emotion we might experience if we feel attacked, deceived, frustrated, invalidated, or unfairly treated. Anger can sometimes be helpful as it helps us identify problems or things hurting us, motivates us to create change, and helps us stay safe and defend ourselves in dangerous situations. Anger only becomes a problem when it gets out of control and harms you or the people around you. The Novaco Anger Scale evaluates how you go through anger and the type of events or circumstances that will lead to angry outbursts. It analyzes elements including aggression, arousal, irritability, and the ability to calm down in emotional situations.

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Perceived Stress Scale
10 questions

Some stress is normal, and brief or mild stress can even be beneficial. In a fast-paced or potentially dangerous situation, stress prepares the body to act with a faster pulse, more oxygen intake, muscles ready to move, and a brain ready to think. Although we don’t have to face off against wild animals anymore (well, at least most of the time), unexpected events that are emotionally loaded trigger the same fight-or-flight response. This response is useful when you’re in a life-threatening situation, but repeated activation over a long period of time takes a toll on your body. The PSS-10 test can give you a pretty good idea of your own perception of stress. In simple terms, it can easily help you figure out whether or not your experienced stress levels are normal for you. However, this test will not tell you how and why you are experiencing stress. Introduced by researchers Cohen, Kamarck, and Mermelstein in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, the PSS is widely acknowledged, clinically validated, and used by many reputable medical services. The questions in this test ask about your feelings and thoughts during the last month. You will be asked to indicate how often you felt or thought a certain way. Although some of the questions are similar, there are differences between them and you should treat each one as a separate question.

Learn more
Generalised Anxiety Disorder
7 questions

Anxiety is more than just ‘being worried about everything’ like some people think. Anxiety is a feeling of unease, such as worry or fear, that can be mild or severe. Everyone has feelings of anxiety at some point in their life. It’s particularly common to experience some anxiety while coping with stressful events or changes, especially if they could have a big impact on your life. This research-backed test measures the severity of your anxiety. Use this brief test to help you determine if you may need to see a mental health professional for diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, or for tracking your anxiety and mood on a regular basis. You can use the test on a weekly basis to track your moods. It also might be used to show your doctor how your symptoms have changed from one visit to the next.

Learn more
Flourishing scale
8 questions

The Flourishing scale (FS) measures people’s success (self rated) in key areas of one’s life, such as relationships and having a sense of purpose.

Learn more
Penn State Worry Questionnaire
16 questions

Everyone worries from time to time, and many people consider themselves worriers. Worries are usually a “what if'' question about something terrible happening in the immediate or distant future. Examples could be: “What if we get caught in traffic tomorrow and I’m late for the game? The coach will be so angry at me and kick me off the team.” “What if I choose the wrong topic for my essay and then change my mind halfway through, and then it’s too late, and I do a really crappy job?” The PSWQ is a self-report scale designed to measure worry in adults.

Learn more
Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale
27 questions

Dealing with uncertainty is an unavoidable part of daily life. Because we can’t see the future, we can never be certain about what exactly is going to happen day to day. Research has found that people vary in their ability to tolerate uncertainty. That is, some people are fine with having a lot of uncertainty in their lives, and other people cannot stand even a small amount of uncertainty. When people who are intolerant of uncertainty are exposed to a little bit of uncertainty, they also have a strong reaction: they worry, and do everything they can think of to get away from, avoid or eliminate the uncertainty. But being very intolerant of uncertainty can cause problems, since it leads to a lot of time-consuming and tiring behaviors, causes stress and anxiety, and is the major fuel for worry.

Learn more
Patient Health Questionnaire
9 questions

Depression isn’t just a case of the blues where you feel down for a while. Most people go through periods of feeling down, but when you’re depressed you feel persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days. Depression affects people in different ways and can cause a wide range of symptoms from lasting feelings of unhappiness and hopelessness, to losing interest in the things you used to enjoy. Symptoms of depression can occur along a spectrum both in duration and severity. This test is often used in a primary care setting to assess the likelihood of depression and how severe it might be. The screening has nine questions, and those questions ask how often you have been bothered by a series of nine problems during the last two weeks. The questions address sleep, energy, appetite, and other symptoms of depression, as well as the frequency of these symptoms.

Learn more
Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale
24 questions

It’s normal to feel nervous in some social situations. For example, going on a date or giving a presentation may cause that feeling of butterflies in your stomach. Feelings of shyness or discomfort in certain situations aren’t necessarily signs of social anxiety disorder. Comfort levels in social situations vary, depending on personality traits and life experiences. Some people are naturally reserved and others are more outgoing. Contrary to everyday nervousness, social anxiety disorder induces fear, anxiety and avoidance that interfere with relationships, daily routines, work, school or other activities. Liebowitz Social Anxiety test assesses the way that social anxiety plays a role in your life across a variety of situations.

Learn more
Novaco Anger Scale
25 questions

We all feel angry at times – it’s part of being human. Anger is a normal, healthy emotion we might experience if we feel attacked, deceived, frustrated, invalidated, or unfairly treated. Anger can sometimes be helpful as it helps us identify problems or things hurting us, motivates us to create change, and helps us stay safe and defend ourselves in dangerous situations. Anger only becomes a problem when it gets out of control and harms you or the people around you. The Novaco Anger Scale evaluates how you go through anger and the type of events or circumstances that will lead to angry outbursts. It analyzes elements including aggression, arousal, irritability, and the ability to calm down in emotional situations.

Learn more
Perceived Stress Scale
10 questions

Some stress is normal, and brief or mild stress can even be beneficial. In a fast-paced or potentially dangerous situation, stress prepares the body to act with a faster pulse, more oxygen intake, muscles ready to move, and a brain ready to think. Although we don’t have to face off against wild animals anymore (well, at least most of the time), unexpected events that are emotionally loaded trigger the same fight-or-flight response. This response is useful when you’re in a life-threatening situation, but repeated activation over a long period of time takes a toll on your body. The PSS-10 test can give you a pretty good idea of your own perception of stress. In simple terms, it can easily help you figure out whether or not your experienced stress levels are normal for you. However, this test will not tell you how and why you are experiencing stress. Introduced by researchers Cohen, Kamarck, and Mermelstein in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, the PSS is widely acknowledged, clinically validated, and used by many reputable medical services. The questions in this test ask about your feelings and thoughts during the last month. You will be asked to indicate how often you felt or thought a certain way. Although some of the questions are similar, there are differences between them and you should treat each one as a separate question.

Learn more
Generalised Anxiety Disorder
7 questions

Anxiety is more than just ‘being worried about everything’ like some people think. Anxiety is a feeling of unease, such as worry or fear, that can be mild or severe. Everyone has feelings of anxiety at some point in their life. It’s particularly common to experience some anxiety while coping with stressful events or changes, especially if they could have a big impact on your life. This research-backed test measures the severity of your anxiety. Use this brief test to help you determine if you may need to see a mental health professional for diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, or for tracking your anxiety and mood on a regular basis. You can use the test on a weekly basis to track your moods. It also might be used to show your doctor how your symptoms have changed from one visit to the next.

Learn more
Self-control
36 questions

Self-control is the ability to regulate one’s emotions, thoughts, and behavior in the face of temptations and impulses. Common goals such as exercising regularly, eating a balanced diet, being more productive, giving up bad habits, and saving money are just a few worthwhile ambitions that usually require self-control to achieve. Self-control is important for maintaining healthy behaviors. The Self-Control Scale measures an individual's ability to control their impulses, alter their thoughts and emotions and prevent undesired behavioural tendencies to prevent acting upon them.

Learn more
Executive skills
36 questions

Executive function skills are the mental processes that enable us to plan, focus attention, remember instructions, juggle multiple tasks successfully, and self-regulate. Executive skills are highly correlated with success in life. Knowing our skills, identifying our challenges, and finding coping strategies are key. The ESQ was developed to help you understand your executive skills, and identify or verify potential problem areas, rather than as an objective measure of problem areas. The most important thing the ESQ attempts to clarify is whether your pattern of strengths and weaknesses enable you to be (reasonably) successful in managing your responsibilities and challenges.

Learn more
Attitudes Towards Self
10 questions

The ATS scale measures the tendency to be self-critical at any failure to perform well, holdings of overly high standards, and finally, the tendency to generalize from a single failure to the broader sense of self-worth.

Learn more
General Self Efficacy scale
10 questions

Self-efficacy is the belief that you can effectively reach the goals you have, whether that is solving a puzzle, successfully preparing and succeeding in your exam, or dealing with hardships. Self-efficacy is often considered in respect to specific goals or challenges. The generalized self-efficacy scale is about the general belief in oneself to solve problems and reach goals. The GSE is one of the best-known scales.

Learn more
Personality test
44 questions

This test measures five personality traits: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism. Openness measures your level of creativity and desire for knowledge and new experiences; Conscientiousness measures your levels of thoughtfulness, impulse control, and goal-directed behaviors; Extraversion measures excitability, sociability, talkativeness, assertiveness, and emotional expressiveness; Agreeableness measures trust, altruism, kindness, affection, and other prosocial behaviour; and Neuroticism measures emotional instability or tendency to experience negative emotions, such as anger, anxiety, or depression.

Learn more
Attachement Style
40 questions

Attachment styles describe the different ways people interact and behave in relationships. Research has shown that our attachment style is set in early childhood and persists throughout our lifetime. The styles are either secure or insecure. If a child grows up with consistency, reliability, and safety, they will likely have a secure style of attachment. As adults, the individuals who are securely attached tend to have trusting, lasting relationships, good self-esteem, the ability to share feelings with partners and friends, and seek out social support. Individuals who develop insecure attachment did not grow up in a consistent, supportive, validating environment. As adults, they generally have trouble making emotional connections with others; they can be aggressive or unpredictable toward their loved ones. Signs of insecure attachment style often include depression and anxiety, frequent outbursts and erratic behaviors, poor self-image and self-hatred, and the perpetuation of trauma in relationships.

Learn more
Emotional Intelligence
50 questions

Emotional intelligence is the ability to understand, interpret, and manage your emotions and those of other people. If you have high EQ, you can communicate with others, show empathy when needed, and overcome emotionally-charged situations. This self-assessment questionnaire is designed to get you thinking about the various competencies of emotional intelligence as they apply to you. The competencies include self-awareness (i.e. the ability to recognize what you are feeling, to understand your habitual emotional responses to events, and to recognize how your emotions affect your behaviour and performance), managing emotions (i.e. the ability to stay focused and think clearly even when experiencing powerful emotions.), motivating oneself (i.e. the ability to use your deepest emotions to move and guide you towards your goals), empathy (i.e. the ability to sense, understand and respond to what other people are feeling), and social skill (i.e. the ability to manage, influence and inspire emotions in others).

Learn more
Disclaimer: These online psychological tests are for your educational use only and do not replace in any way a formal psychiatric evaluation. Remember, for a diagnosis, you need to contact a licensed mental health professional.