Difficult relationship with food

There are many  possible factors that can influence your difficult relationship with food. We chose scientifically validated tests that can help you identify specific areas of concern.
Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26)
The EAT-26 assesses three main areas of disordered eating: dieting, bulimic behaviors, and food preoccupation. It is not a diagnostic tool, and scores on the EAT-26 do not necessarily indicate the presence of an eating disorder. However, high scores on the EAT-26 may indicate the need for further evaluation by a mental health professional.
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Appearance anxiety inventory
individuals with higher levels of appearance anxiety are more likely to have negative body image, experience dissatisfaction with their appearance, and engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors, such as dieting, binge eating, and purging. Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder, often involve a distorted body image and a preoccupation with weight and appearance. Individuals with eating disorders may experience anxiety about their appearance and may feel pressure to conform to societal expectations about body size and shape. Research has also shown that individuals with eating disorders are more likely to score higher on measures of appearance anxiety, such as the AAI.
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Depression test (PHQ-7)
Depression and eating disorders often co-occur and can have a complex relationship. Depression can contribute to the development of an eating disorder, as people with depression may turn to disordered eating behaviors as a way to cope with negative feelings or to try to gain a sense of control.
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Anxiety test (GAD-7)
Anxiety and eating disorders often co-occur, and anxiety can play a significant role in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. People with anxiety disorders may turn to disordered eating behaviors, such as restrictive eating or binge eating, as a way to cope with feelings of anxiety or to try to gain a sense of control. These behaviors may temporarily reduce anxiety in the short term, but they can also contribute to the development of an eating disorder over time.
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Perceived stress test
individuals with eating disorders often experience high levels of stress and may turn to food and eating behaviors as a means of coping with these stressors. For example, individuals with anorexia nervosa may use food restriction as a way to cope with stress, while individuals with bulimia nervosa may turn to binge eating and purging as a way to cope with negative emotions. In addition, stress has been found to be related to a negative body image and a greater risk of developing an eating disorder. Chronic stress has been linked to an increased risk of developing disordered eating behaviors and may also exacerbate existing eating disorders.
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Emotion deregulation (DERS)
People with eating disorders often struggle with emotion dysregulation, which can manifest in a variety of ways. For example, some people with eating disorders may use food and eating as a way to cope with negative emotions, such as stress, anxiety, or depression. Others may use strict control over food intake as a way to try to regulate their emotions. There is evidence to suggest that people with eating disorders may have an underlying deficiency in their ability to regulate emotions effectively.
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Impulsivity (BIS-11)
Impulsivity is a common trait among people with eating disorders, and it may play a role in the development and maintenance of these disorders. For example, people with eating disorders may have difficulty controlling their impulses around food, leading them to engage in unhealthy eating behaviors such as binge eating or purging. They may also have difficulty controlling their impulses in other areas of their lives, such as spending, sex, or substance use, which can further contribute to the problems associated with the eating disorder. There is some evidence to suggest that impulsivity may be related to deficits in decision-making and impulse control, which may be related to structural and functional abnormalities in certain brain regions. In people with eating disorders, impulsivity may be linked to abnormal activity in the frontal lobes, which are responsible for decision-making, problem-solving, and impulse control.
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Self-esteem
Low self-esteem is a common trait among people with eating disorders, and it may play a role in the development and maintenance of these disorders. For example, some people with eating disorders may use food and eating as a way to cope with negative feelings about themselves. They may develop an unhealthy relationship with food as a way to feel more in control of their lives or to try to find comfort and acceptance. Alternatively, they may develop strict rules around food and eating as a way to try to achieve the "perfect" body and improve their self-esteem. On the other hand, people with eating disorders may also have distorted beliefs about their bodies, which can lead to low self-esteem. They may see their bodies as imperfect or flawed, even when they are not, and this can lead to negative feelings about themselves and their worth.
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Psychological flexibility
People with eating disorders may struggle with psychological flexibility, as they may have a limited range of coping strategies and may be inflexible in their thinking and behavior. They may also have difficulty accepting their emotions and thoughts and may rely on unhealthy coping mechanisms such as disordered eating to avoid or escape from difficult experiences. There is some evidence to suggest that psychological inflexibility may be related to the development and maintenance of eating disorders. For example, people with eating disorders may have rigid thinking patterns and may struggle to adapt to changing circumstances. They may also have a narrow focus on achieving the "perfect" body or appearance, which can lead to inflexibility in their behaviors and actions.
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Perfectionism scale
Individuals with perfectionistic tendencies may be more likely to develop negative body image and engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors, such as restrictive dieting and binge eating. Perfectionistic individuals may also be more likely to experience negative consequences as a result of their eating disorder behaviors, such as weight fluctuations and health problems, but may still feel compelled to continue these behaviors in an attempt to achieve their perceived ideal body. They may also be more resistant to seeking help for their eating disorder because they fear that seeking treatment means admitting failure or being seen as imperfect.
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Attachement style
"Individuals with an insecure attachment style, which is characterized by a lack of trust in others and a fear of intimacy, may be more at risk for developing eating disorders. This may be because individuals with an insecure attachment style may have difficulty regulating their emotions and may turn to food and eating behaviors as a means of coping with negative feelings. Insecure attachment has also been found to be related to a negative body image and a greater risk of developing an eating disorder. On the other hand, individuals with a secure attachment style, which is characterized by trust in others and a sense of comfort with intimacy, may be less at risk for developing eating disorders. Secure attachment has been found to be related to a positive body image and a lower risk of developing an eating disorder. "
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Self-control
People with eating disorders may perceive themselves as lacking self-control, particularly around food and their body weight. They may engage in disordered eating behaviors, such as restrictive eating or binge eating, in an attempt to exert control over their food intake and body weight.
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BIS/BAS
"Individuals with eating disorders tend to score higher on the BIS scale, indicating a greater tendency to experience negative emotions and to avoid threatening or aversive situations. Individuals with eating disorders tend to score lower on the BAS scale, indicating a lower tendency to approach and pursue positive goals and rewards. These findings suggest that individuals with eating disorders may be more vulnerable to negative affect and may have difficulty seeking pleasure or enjoyment."
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PNAS
Individuals with eating disorders tend to score higher on the negative affect scale of the PANAS, indicating higher levels of negative emotions such as anger, fear, and sadness. Individuals with eating disorders tend to score lower on the positive affect scale of the PANAS, indicating lower levels of positive emotions such as happiness, enthusiasm, and contentment. These findings suggest that individuals with eating disorders may be more vulnerable to negative affect and may have difficulty seeking pleasure or enjoyment.
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Compassion motivation and action scales
Self-compassion is associated with higher engagement in intuitive eating.
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Executive skills
Individuals with eating disorders may struggle with inhibitory control when it comes to food and eating behaviors. For example, individuals with anorexia nervosa may have difficulty controlling their impulses to restrict their food intake, even when they are hungry, while individuals with bulimia nervosa may have difficulty controlling their impulses to binge eat and purge. People with eating disorders frequently present with inflexible behaviours around eating related issues, have rigid rituals around the daily routine and experience difficulties in seeing alternative ways of coping with problems.
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